Help Me Go to Ghana! 

For my birthday help me live out my dream of going to Ghana and also help the House of Israel Community of Southwest Ghana! 

On November 11, 2016 I head to Ghana, Benin and Togo to visit West Africa for the first time. While there I will visit the House of Israel Community of Sefwi Hebrews who live and farm according to Torah Law. I am developing a relationship to work as a Community Development Coordinator for the House of Israel Ghana and help connect them to Black Hebrew, Black Christian and Jewish communities. This tribe migrated from Israel generations ago. Visiting this community will help me gather research for my book Prophetic Whirlwind: Uncovering the Black Biblical Destiny!
For or more information on the House of Israel Ghana visit: http://www.scatteredamongthenations.org/ghana/

Half the proceeds of this fundraiser will go directly to the House of Israel community to help them develop their Guest House is and meet general community needs. The rest of the proceeds will help me cover expenses for my trip. 

To donate visit: https://www.youcaring.com/onleilove-house-of-israel-ghana-613544#

Thank You and Be Blessed!

What Vincent van Gogh can Teach us about Clergy, Artist & Depression

Though I still love Kandinsky I have to show some love to Vincent van Gogh. Many may not know that he was a missionary early in life and tried to become a minister but failed in theology school and was fired from his missionary post for actually following in Christ foot steps and living among the poor miners he ministered to; he actually slept on the floor and lived in poverty by choice. The church felt his choice demeaned the office of minister-wow what spiritual ignorance. What many may not know is that Van Gogh’s most well known work Starry Night is a powerful indictment on the church because all the buildings in the painting have lights that are turned on except–the church. Starry Night always challenges me to consider about my role as a faith-based organizer and spiritual person-is the light of Christ turned on in my life? On one hand I have always wondered (with indignation) what  the church lost because Van Gogh was not allowed to minister, but the Holy Spirit allowed me to see  that by being kicked out of the church Van Gogh’s purpose was able to expand so that generations are able to benefit from his art. Sometimes our anointing and gifts are too expansion for the church, but I don’t want to start preaching so I will let you all meditate on that! “Van Gogh aspired to become an artist in God’s service, stating: “…to try to understand the real significance of what the great artists, the serious masters, tell us in their masterpieces, that leads to God; one man wrote or told it in a book; another in a picture.” Van Gogh can teach us much about what true ministry is and the role of depression in the lives of many artist and clergy(yes many clergy suffer with depression even Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King faced bouts of depression).

English: Theo van Gogh, 21 years of age. Accor...

English: Theo van Gogh, 21 years of age. According to the Nationaal Archief this would be Vincent van Gogh, the source of this photograph is the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. However, Stedelijk Museum transferred their material to the Van Gogh Museum when it was founded. The latter states it is a depiction of Theo van Gogh.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Personally, I have struggled with depression and though I am healed from the darkest bouts, to stay in that healing I have to lean on God’s grace, seek out help and make choices each day to live in joy.

What can the life and work of Van Gogh teach us about the role of depression in the lives of ministers and artist?

Note: as I understand Van Gogh my have lost his faith after being rejected by a woman he was pursuing and her family, but anyone who walks this path of faith knows that there are ups and downs and so we can not judge the final destination his journey.

Occupy-Chaplaincy!!!

This blog first appeared on the Poverty Initiative Union in Dialogue Blog: A New & Unsettling Force.

Below are two pieces by Poverty Initiative leaders discussing the different contexts in which they have served as chaplains and how this work is connected to the broader movement to end Poverty. The first is a reflection by Jennifer Wilder about her work with the Union protest chaplains who have been serving in Zuccotti (Liberty) Park for the past several weeks of Occupy Wall Street. Jenn’s reflection is followed by an excerpt from a reflection that Union alum and Poverty Initiative leader Onleilove Alston wrote about being a chaplain over the years with the Poverty Initiative, “on the field of battle for justice.”

CHAPLAINCY IN ZUCCOTTI PARK FOR ‘OCCUPY WALL STREET

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Lenten Reflection for MARK 10:46-52: “What do you want me to do for you?”

This is a lenten reflection I wrote for Park Avenue Christian Church’s Lenten Series and I wanted to share it with all of you in the hopes that you receive some encouragement from it, be blessed!

Blind Bartimaeus Receives His Sight

MARK 10:46-52

46 Then they came to Jericho. As Jesus and his disciples, together with a large crowd, were leaving the city, a blind man, Bartimaeus (which means “son of Timaeus”), was sitting by the roadside begging. 47 When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” 48 Many rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but he shouted all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” 49 Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So they called to the blind man, “Cheer up! On your feet! He’s calling you.” 50 Throwing his cloak aside, he jumped to his feet and came to Jesus.  51 “What do you want me to do for you?” Jesus asked him.  The blind man said, “Rabbi, I want to see.”  52 “Go,” said Jesus, “your faith has healed you.” Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus along the road.

Reflection

“Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Bartimaeus was desperate for healing, so he boldly called out for what he needed though he was rebuked for doing so. Bartimaues’ neighbors probably found his display of desperation embarrassing and unsettling. Many times in our communities we allow ourselves and others to suffer in silence, but in this passage, God shows us that he is not unsettled by our cries, but will respond to them.

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